April 29th, 2015

With a large portion of their team swimming at their last CIS Championships this past February, the University of Calgary is completely re-vamping their roster with a huge freshman class that should set them up for plenty of success.

Most recently, they signed six swimmers to the roster who will likely have a direct impact on the success of the team. Some have the ability to compete at a very high level with the possibility of scoring points for Calgary at the CIS Championships and the Canada West conference Championships.

CHRISTIAN NG – Markham Aquatic Club

Christian Ng is on the fast track to becoming one of the best IM swimmers in Canada. During the 2013-2014 season he was the top ranked male in his age-group in the 400m IM.

He has plenty of international experience on Canada’s junior teams, representing Canada at the Australian Age Group Nationals.

Ng just swam at the 2015 Canadian Team Trials with his best swim being a ninth place finish in the 200m IM with a 2:06.87.

Calgary already has a very solid group of medley swimmers, where Ng will fit in very nicely.

CONNOR MATTHEZING – Killarney Swim Club

“I’d just like to say that i’m really excited to swim as a Dino next year, it should be a great season with great swimmers and a new experience with some different coaches.”

Connor Matthezing has already established himself as a very solid age-group swimmer, competing successfully at last summers age-group nationals. ConnorMatthezing

His best finish at the meet was a 16th place finish in the boys 16-18 200m freestyle where he clocked in at 1:58.02. He’s a freestyler through and through with some good fly swims as well.

His 100 free at the meet was a 53.96, his 100 fly a 59.28. His 100m fly was arguably his second best swim at the meet, with his 200 grabbing him a 24th place finish in 2:17.51.

Matthezing could become a crucial component to the Calgary relays in the upcoming years. He has the potential to make an impact on the 200 freestyle relay if he can drop some time over the next few seasons.

LUCAS GRABOSKI – University of Calgary Swim Club

“The decision to stay at home was influenced by multiple things. First and foremost was the fact that I’ve been able to watch the swimmers, as well as Mike Blondal and Mads Hansen in action here at home. My current coach, Carl Simonson, was supportive of my decision to stay at U of C. I like the University of Calgary on the academic side as it is a young but success oriented university. I look forward to fast swimming, as well as a close team dynamic. My parents are both former CIS swimmers, and they encouraged me to consider the Dinos. My mom is Keltie Duggan, who swam in the 1988 Olympics.” 
 

Lucas GraboskiGraboski is a home-grown swimmer training out of the University of Calgary Swim Club. He’s all too familiar with the process and will fit in very nicely with the varsity team at the university.

Graboski is primarily a breaststroker and will be a very important asset to the team as Bogdan Knezevic is gone. Graboski is the defending age-group national champion in the 100m breaststroke.

His best short course 10m breaststroke is a 1:03.36 with his long-course 100 being a 1:06.74. He boasts a 29.95 50m breaststroke in short course meters, with his long-course 50 being a 30.90.

His 200s are solid as well, with a 2:21.07 short and a 2:28.89 long.

PATRICIA FORTIER – Prince George Barracudas

Patricia Fortier comes from the west coast, representing the Prince George Barracudas in British Columbia.

She’s represented her province at the 2013 Canada Summer Games, and has even represented Canada. At the 2015 Mel Zajac Canada Cup she was a member of the Junior Canadian team. Patricia Fortier

Last summer at the Canadian Age Group Championships Fortier’s best swim was a 9th place finish the 200m IM.

Since then Fortier competed at the 2015 Canadian Team Trials where she swam both IMs as well as the 200m backstroke. She rocked a 5:12.66 in the 400 and a 2:26.84 in the 200.

Her 200 backstroke was a 2:26.24.

She has a wide skill-set which will be of big advantage to Calgary as they have some time to shape her into a potential point scorer at the CIS Championships.

JAROD TSANG – University of Calgary Swim Club

Jarod Tsang is another swimmer hailing out of the University of Calgary Swim Club, and will help add plenty of depth to the backstroke events.

He’s a very solid backstroker and will be training with Canadian record holder Russell Wood and Calgary’s Josh Dow.

Jarod Tsang (left)

Jarod Tsang (left)

Tsang is already swimming times that dip under the CIS qualifying times. Last summer at the Canadian age group Championships he swam a 2:07.19 in the 200m backstroke to place second overall in the event in the 16-18 age-group.

He swam a very solid 50 backstroke, 100 backstroke, and even went the distance to put together an impressive 200m IM swim. With great training partners, Tsang looks as though he could an important player on the Calgary roster.

KEVIN VILIUNAS – Canadian Dolphin Swim Club

“I’m just excited to train with such an elite team. I feel Calgary will provide me the opportunity to improve my swimming and most importantly help me perform well in school. I also chose Calgary because I love what Mike and Mads have done to the swimming program. They are organized, smart, and ready to be the best. My future teammates are people that I would look up to and would enjoy to be around. This program will not only make me a better swimmer but also a better person.” 

Kevin Viliunas will bring a lot of talent to the Calgary roster. He’s the owner of plenty of age-group national medals.

In the most recent edition of the Canadian Age Group Championships, Viliunas was a 26.04 in the 50m fly to come fifth overall in the 16-18 year-olds final.

He swam plenty of other races including a 54.41 in the 100m freestyle, a 29.14 in the 50m backstroke, a 24.93 in the 50m freestyle, and a 2:00.52 in the 200m free.

He’s got a wide range of events he could specialize in, and it should be interesting to see where CIS swimming will take him.

Kevin Viliunas

 

Source : Swim Swam